Blue Ridge Two-lined Salamander
Eurycea wilderae

Common Name:

Blue Ridge Two-lined Salamander

Scientific Name:

Eurycea wilderae

Etymology:

Genus:

Eurycea has no known meaning, but is thought to be mythological in nature.

Species:

wilderae is in honor of Inez Luanne Whipple Wilder (1871-1929)

Average Length:

2.8 - 4.3 in. (7 - 10.7 cm)

Virginia Record Length:

Record length:

4.8 in (12.1 cm)

Virginia Wildlife Action Plan Rating Tier III - High Conservation Need - Extinction or extirpation is possible. Populations of these species are in decline or have declined to low levels or are in a restricted range. Management action is needed to stabilize or increase populations.

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION: Dorsolateral dark stripe heavy, black, with straight upper edge; continuous on basal half or two-thirds of tail, broken into a series of spots on distal half; sides below dorsolateral band marked with definite black spots of irregular size and shape; length to 120 mm *1009*; male's head swollen back of the eyes; female's head slender with almost parallel sides; male's snout broad; female's snout bluntly pointed; noticeable glandular hump at base of male's tail, dorsally *1009*.

REPRODUCTION: The clutch averages 43 eggs that are laid under rocks or other cover in seeps or streams, usually in running water; 50 days are usually required for hatching, depending on the air temperatures; hatching occurs from late June through August *10812*.

BEHAVIOR: Found in and along the margins of mountain springs and streams; hide beneath sheltering objects such as stones, bark, logs, and other debris; occasionally found far from open water under logs, bark, moss, and leaves in damp situations; most abundant above 2000 feet *1009*. Courtship can occur on land or in the water during early spring *10812*.

References for Life History

  • 1009 - Bishop, S.C., 1943, Handbook of Salamanders, 555 pgs., Comstock Publ. Co., New York, NY
  • 2077 - Russ, W.P., 1973, The rare and endangered terrestrial vertebrates of Virginia, Ph.D. dissertation, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, 339 pgs.
  • 10812 - Organ, J.A., 1990, Salamander Survey Section One 1990, Prepared for the Mount Rogers National Recreation Area, Jefferson National Forest, 40 pgs., Dept. of Bio. of the City College of New York, New York

Photos:

*Click on a thumbnail for a larger version.


Verified County/City Occurrence

Carroll County
Grayson County
Smyth County
Washington County
Verified in 4 Counties/Cities.



FROGS

Virginia is home to 28 species of frogs and toads.

SALAMANDERS

We have a large diversity of salamanders consisting of 56 different species and subspecies.

LIZARDS

Virginia is home to 9 native lizard species and two introduced species, the Mediterranean Gecko and the Italian Wall Lizard.

SNAKES

The Commonwealth is home to 34 species and subspecies of snake. Only 3 species are venomous.

TURTLES

Virginia has 25 species and subspecies of turtle. Five of these species are sea turtle.