Lizards of Virginia

Virginia Lizard Identification Guide

Eastern Six-lined Racerunner
(Aspidoscelis sexlineata sexlineata)
Average Length: 6 - 10.5 in. (15.2 - 26.7 cm)

Mediterranean Gecko
(Hemidactylus turcicus)
Average Length: 4 - 5 in. (10 - 12.7 cm)

Introduced species

Eastern Slender Glass Lizard
(Ophisaurus attenuatus longicaudus)
Average Length: 22 - 46.5 in. (56 - 118.1 cm)

Virginia Wildlife Action Plan Rating: Tier IV

Eastern Glass Lizard
(Ophisaurus ventralis)
Average Length: 22 - 46.5 in. (56 - 118.1 cm)

* State threatened *
Virginia Wildlife Action Plan Rating: Tier II

Northern Coal Skink
(Plestiodon anthracinus anthracinus)
Average Length: 5 - 7 in. (12.5 - 17.8 cm)

Note: All lizards native to Virginia in the genus Plestiodon have bright blue tails as juveniles/subadults.

Common Five-lined Skink
(Plestiodon fasciatus)
Average Length: 5 - 7 in. (12.5 - 17.8 cm)

Note: All lizards native to Virginia in the genus Plestiodon have bright blue tails as juveniles/subadults.

Southeastern Five-lined Skink
(Plestiodon inexpectatus)
Average Length: 5.5 - 8.5 in. (14 - 21.6 cm)

Note: All lizards native to Virginia in the genus Plestiodon have bright blue tails as juveniles/subadults.

Broad-headed Skink
(Plestiodon laticeps)
Average Length: 6.5 - 12.75 in. (16.5 - 32.4 cm)

Note: All lizards native to Virginia in the genus Plestiodon have bright blue tails as juveniles/subadults.

Eastern Fence Lizard
(Sceloporus undulatus)
Average Length: 4 - 7.25 in. (10 - 18.4 cm)

Little Brown Skink
(Scincella lateralis)
Average Length: 3 - 5.75 in. (7.5 - 14.6 cm)


The Virginia Herpetological Society follows the naming conventions set forth by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, The Herpetologists’ League, and the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles. For the most current list click here.

Virginia Wildlife Action Plan Rating Tier IV - Moderate Conservation Need - The species may be rare in parts of its range, particularly on the periphery. Populations of these species have demonstrated a significant declining trend or one is suspected which, if continued, is likely to qualify this species for a higher tier in the foreseeable future. Long-term planning is necessary to stabilize or increase populations.

Virginia Wildlife Action Plan Rating Tier III - High Conservation Need - Extinction or extirpation is possible. Populations of these species are in decline or have declined to low levels or are in a restricted range. Management action is needed to stabilize or increase populations.

Virginia Wildlife Action Plan Rating Tier II - Very High Conservation Need - Has a high risk of extinction or extirpation. Populations of these species are at very low levels, facing real threat(s), or occur within a very limited distribution. Immediate management is needed for stabilization and recovery.

Virginia Wildlife Action Plan Rating Tier I - Critical Conservation Need - Faces an extremely high risk of extinction or extirpation. Populations of these species are at critically low levels, facing immediate threat(s), or occur within an extremely limited range. Intense and immediate management action is needed.

FROGS

Virginia is home to 28 species of frogs and toads.

SALAMANDERS

We have a large diversity of salamanders consisting of 56 different species and subspecies.

LIZARDS

Virginia is home to 9 native lizard species and two introduced species, the Mediterranean Gecko and the Italian Wall Lizard.

SNAKES

The Commonwealth is home to 34 species and subspecies of snake. Only 3 species are venomous.

TURTLES

Virginia has 25 species and subspecies of turtle. Five of these species are sea turtle.